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Your Dog Displays Dominance Aggression What To Do


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#1 Luddud

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 09:51 AM

Your Dog Displays Dominance Aggression What To Do :lol: In this article, we'll take a closer look at a particular form of aggression in which your canine tries to exert dominance. We'll first define the problem so you'll understand the factors that trigger it. You'll also learn how to recognize dominant traits in your pet, and the steps to take toward reshaping them. Of all canine behavioral problems, those stemming from aggression are among the most challenging. Not only does aggressive behavior in dogs pose a danger to people and other pets, but owners rarely know how to curb the issue. It often turns into a perpetual struggle that seems beyond their control. In reality, the problem can be successfully modified with the right approach. Signs Of A Dominant Canine Many owners believe this problem occurs only in adult dogs. While this is usually the case, dominance aggression can also display in puppies. Common signs include a resistance to commands that are well-understood, tendency to protect toys and other possessions, and growling and barking for reasons that are unclear.  Your canine may also be dominantly aggressive if he refuses to get out of your way when you are walking toward him. Likewise, if he jumps on your furniture, and refuses to obey you when you order him to climb down, he may be subtly exerting his will. This behavioral problem is usually progressive; there is a good chance he'll become more aggressive with time. It begins on a small scale, and worsens as the canine seeks to increase his authority. For this reason, it is important to take steps as early as possible to break the habit. Dominance Aggression Defined In order to properly define the behavior, it's necessary to distinguish it from similar, yet different, behaviors. Dominance aggression does not refer to a dog that is reacting to prolonged abuse. Nor does it refer to a pet that is trying to assert its will, but in the end, complies.  A canine that is dominantly aggressive asserts his will, and refuses to concede ground. For example, he might growl and bark belligerently at his owner when directed to do something he does not like. He might protect his possessions and space, even from his owner and family. If a person stares at him, he may react violently; if reprimanded, he may become hostile in order to convey his dominance over the other; and if another pet occupies his sleeping area, he might become antagonistic.  These behavioral traits are problematic because they can endanger you and your family. If you provide care for other pets, the behavior can lead to confrontations. Breaking The Habit Of Aggression First, make sure your dog receives plenty of exercise. Most owners provide their canines with much less exercise than they need. While a single, short daily walk is good, most dogs will relish up to an hour of strenuous activity each day. This helps them burn off the energy that builds up through out the day, making aggressive behavior less likely. Second, avoid doing things that may trigger an aggressive response from your dog. For example, don't stare at him; avoid playing too roughly with him; and avoid waking him unless necessary. Third, make your canine work for anything he wants. For instance, if he wants to go for a walk, make him sit patiently, and wait for you. If he wants you to pet him, require him to sit quietly before you do so. This communicates you have authority over him, and are in control. Fourth, be consistent. Dogs learn by repetition. Their expectations are based on observing the same things occurring over and over. If you are consistent in your training, you'll have better success establishing yourself as the authority in your dog's "pack." Dominance aggression in canines can become dangerous as it evolves. Take the necessary steps to shape the behavior while it is in its earliest stages. Enjoy more and to receive your free report, (5-Dog Training Myths) visit the link below.. “DOG TRAINING SCHOOL 101”
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#2 Catsfriend

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 07:03 PM

Luddud, I believe your postings are valuable, but they are too long for a forum. Have you already written a book? If not, it would be a great idea if you do - then set up a website where you sell this book (or give it away as a free e-book, if you don't want to make any money) and use forums like this one only to refer to that website! New topics on Internet forums are more effective (will be read and get responses) if they are short and sweet - later, in the answers sections, it is okay if you elaborate in detail. That is just meant as good advice from a forum moderator (elsewhere), not criticism!

#3 Luddud

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 09:37 AM

Thank you, Catsfriend: I do tend to go over board.. sorry I try to give the most INFO when i can...
Good Day Dog lovers; If you and your family; are enjoying training your Dog or a new friend. We may can give you some friendly advice...Visit us here..
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To enjoy more of my WebSites and Articles: You may go to http://thomassludwig.com Go to "Helpful Sites" and click on each of my Sites; and enjoy!! Visit my Facebook Fan page; Dog Training School 101 for great tip's and freebies.. http://www.facebook.com/Luddud

#4 PugLove

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 09:05 AM

Thank you for the info. I've had my pug for 2 years and can't seem to defer his dominance towards me. I am now getting better as I have been 'training' my self more than the dog lol. My question is, how do you ensure he is not jumping on the couch where you're gone? My pug doesn't jump on the furniture anymore, but the second I take my eys off of him, he does this. Any tips?

#5 Viv

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 09:10 AM

Puglove--my Mastiffs sleep on the furniture there are NO dominance issues with this. What do you consider dominance???? Just wondering. :)
Viv---adoring Aughra -English Mastiff- Dargon- English Mastiff. Always in our hearts Jorth- English Mastiff- Rontu--Bull Mastiff-- Annie and Blu--Dear Basset Hounds.Drac and Timber--Chow Chows Baron-- Rottweiller

#6 PugLove

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 09:14 AM

Sorry I was thinking of 20000 million things to write lol. I say dominance because when I tell him a firm 'NO' or 'DOWN'.. he growls at me, or bark. He's even tried to bite my hand.. I'm sure playfully. But everytime I say no or disagree on what ever mischieve he is getting into, he growls as if showing me he's the boss. =(

#7 Mary Liz

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 01:07 AM

Is there any more on this thread? I have a similar problem with our 17week old highly intelligent lab puppy. He jumps on the furniture and refuses to get down. I am trying to use dominant behaviour (going first through a door, ignorinig him on arrival etc) but so far not much progress! He is remarkably quick to pick up new ideas and loves our training sessions, especially retrieve and drop. He is good at Sit and Stay but clearly thinks the sofa is his - especially when we are out of the room.

#8 Wild

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 02:44 AM

I recommend that a new puppy or dog not be allowed on the furniture until you get a better understanding of the puppy or dog. Keep him off the furniture for a good three months, then decide if you want him up there. If you then allow it and he starts getting cheeky, keep him off. I think it is not just the dog, but the owner. Some people have personalities that are dominant enough that they can let their otherwise domineering dog get away with sleeping on their bed and sofa, and still be in control. Other people can't. Without watching the two of you in action, it's hard to say if you are doing something wrong with your particular dog. Have your dog sit and wait for you to feed him, make him sit and wait while you open the door, do not pet on demand (when he nudges your hand), do not freely give treats or toys. Again, it depends on the owner and dog how much "alpha" you have to be. Some of my fosters I let on the furniture, others I don't. I don't make my border collie sit at the door any more, or sit for meals.

#9 Viv

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 09:43 AM

Excellent Post Wild. Our mastiffs are allowed on our furniture BUT they know if we say off or no it means what we say. 4 mastiffs so far and no issues!
Viv---adoring Aughra -English Mastiff- Dargon- English Mastiff. Always in our hearts Jorth- English Mastiff- Rontu--Bull Mastiff-- Annie and Blu--Dear Basset Hounds.Drac and Timber--Chow Chows Baron-- Rottweiller

#10 Mary Liz

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 05:27 PM

Thank you! I should say we have had dogs all our lives and never had a problem. They were mostly but not all black labs and very biddable. This pup is yellow, very big and bright - very keen to learn! I'm taking on board all your advice and have had a good morning with him - ignored him and ate first, out of the door before him - all that! Then we had a great game of search and find, drop and small rewards. He is very cute (think Andrex puppy) so gets lots of attention wherever we go. We made a few mistakes in the beginning when he was tiny so he took advantage by getting on sofa. What concerns us is he then defies us and simply won't get off - and we have been told not to push him off. Hmm - will see if being Alpha helps...I am in fact a trainer (people not puppies!) and very interested in the psychology.

#11 Wild

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 10:20 AM

Labs can be very stubborn as well as dominant. There is quite a variation within the lines and you may have had "easier" dogs before. Put a harness on him with a 4 to 6' lead. Tell him "off", pull him off, then praise when he is on the floor. When he does it without being pulled off, praise and treat. Many people teach "on" and "off", use it often for a few weeks, then stop using "on".

#12 Mary Liz

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 07:59 PM

He is certainly pushing the boundaries but we do see an improvement. He still jumps up but (eventually) gets down on command. Also responds to clear arm signals. He has just chewed my husband's treasured diary when his back was turned... Our previous boy never gave us a moment's concern even from 8 weeks old. Sigh!

#13 allstrays

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 07:33 AM

My golden shepherd wouldn't get out of my husband's spot once and I pushed her a little and said "down". She turned and growled at me. I instinctively grabbed the scruff of her neck and forced her down and told her never to growl at me again. The next time she did growl (since she doesn't speak english) I again grabbed the scruff of her neck until I was sure I had her attention and said NO repeatedly. She hasn't growled at me since. I think the confrontation began with my husband playing rough w/ her. She saw nudges as play, but when growling is involved I can't always tell what's play and aggression so I make sure she doesn't growl at or bite me at all. Use toys. She has no problem being on the couch, and she used to not listen when we said down. Since these 2 instances, she'll listen when I say down, but not to my husband. It's wrong, but kinda funny. ( I guess I'm dominant to my husband too haha). ---- By the way, when I did this I made sure never to pull or inflict pain to her. I was just getting her attention. I want her to respect me, not fear me. And, it has not stopped her from being a "guard dog"- she barks and growls at birds and rabbits in the yard ALL the time.

#14 luvmypets

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Posted 17 May 2012 - 03:54 AM

The info was very helpfull. I have a 10 month old rott and pincher mix. He can be so loving at times. But when we have friends and family visit his hair will stand up on his back and he barks non stop.And now when they turn there back to him and ignore him he is lunging at them. What should we do? :( . We are trying to socialize him more but its so hard.

#15 Wild

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Posted 17 May 2012 - 08:34 AM

You need to teach your rottie mix normal household manners. Have a specific spot near the door for him to sit in. In this spot, he should be out of the way of the swing of the door and giving enough room for people to enter. Yet, he should be able to be seen by a visitor. Use treats and praise to get him to know where the spot is. Then, when he knows his proper spot, turn the door handle. If he starts to move from the spot, tell him "uh oh" or some verbal cue that means he did wrong. Have him sit again. Keep doing this until he waits for you to open the door and still maintains the sit. The next step would be to ALWAYS have him sit before you open the door. He has to wait until you say "out". For every potty break you do this. Once this protocol is established, family members who live in the house should come knocking at the door so he can practice good social manners and learn to stay seated until you break him. Your goal is to have him stay in a sit until people can enter, hang up their coat, and sit down. He is then told to go to his "place", a mat in the living room or wherever everyone is. He is to stay there until he calms down. Again, you will have to train him to "place" with rewards so he knows the routine before people come to visit. As he gets older, you can work with him on being petted by people. As long as he is rambunctious, he goes back to his mat. Once he knows what he is supposed to do, he will be more likely to do it.

#16 luvmypets

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 12:26 AM

Thank you so much. He can be so loving at times but the other 1/2 he is very hard to handle. We also have 2 cats and all our pets get equal attention. But he gets upset and has a temper tantrum when we are holding one of the cats. So when we get company i dont know if he is jealous becouse they are getting our attention or if he is protecting us. We got him last october. All our camping and summer trips were done and he did not get socialized with people. All he had all winter was us. I would like to get him under control before we start all our outdoor summer activities.




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